Triggered Email Secrets Green Dart on Bullseye

Triggered Email Secrets from 7 Successful Marketers

I have a secret: a few days ago, my lunch pretty much consisted of a stop at a hip ice cream shop to enjoy a cone with a scoop of my favorite flavor: “Secret Breakfast,” which mixes bourbon-flavored caramel and corn flakes in a sweet cream base. First of all, yum. But it also reminded me how important creativity and surprise can be as marketing tools. Every scoop shop offers bread-and-butter flavors like chocolate and vanilla, but it’s the other buzz-worthy varieties that define their brands. (And I say this as an avowed vanilla-lover.) But what triggered email secrets can I learn from ice cream? 

Think about workhorse triggered emails. Welcome messages, transaction receipts, and shipping notifications probably come to mind. They’re functionally important, and they form the foundation of any successful email program. That’s why every email marketer needs to understand the basics of triggered emails. If you’re in the retail industry, you’ve probably become familiar with how to use triggered email in retail. But what about some unexpected flavors? Today, I’m going to let you in on seven triggered email secrets that you can use to mix up your vanilla programs and drive increased engagement.

1. Onboarding Nudge

Here’s one of my triggered email secrets: there aren’t many people who love onboarding emails more than I do. In its most basic form, onboarding begins with a staple of triggered email—a simple welcome message. However, onboarding also encompasses many additional opportunities to engage with recipients with triggered emails. Here’s one example of an effective form of onboarding. The message breaks the process into easy-to-digest steps and encourages the recipient to take the first step towards engagement.

Triggered Email Secrets #1: Onboarding by Headspace

  • Who: Headspace
  • Trigger: N-days since account creation without taking action
  • Why it works: This email makes it seem easy to achieve the desired action by emphasizing that it takes just 10 minutes.

2. Customer Preferences Solicitation

Guess what? The second triggered email secret I’d like to share is another onboarding message! In this follow-up to an initial welcome message, the recipient is asked to define her or his messaging preferences and some other key demographic information. The benefit to the merchant is clear: not only has a new customer taken a further step to engage with the site, but also has shared explicit data that serves as a foundation for future successful email marketing.

Triggered Email Secrets #2: Preferences by Steve Madden

  • Who: Steve Madden
  • Trigger: New user sign-up
  • Why it works: To sweeten the deal, Steve Madden offers a discount and call-to-action that feels like a win-win.

3. Second Purchase Thank You

Along with a welcome email, a thank you is a cornerstone of any triggered email program. It’s good manners—and represents a step towards building a personalized relationship with a customer. But the secret of this triggered email from Art of Play is that they noted I recently made a second purchase.

Triggered Email Secrets #3: Thank You by Art of Play

  • Who: Art of Play
  • Trigger: Second purchase
  • Why it works: As a customer, I feel really appreciated. The marketer in me understands that Art of Play is using good segmentation to note that I’ve suddenly become a high-value customer to them.

4. First Shipment Notification

Like thank you notes, shipment notifications are a workhorse of any triggered email program. But look at this follow-up to a first shipment notification from Amazon. The email is actually an optimally-timed onboarding message. Rather than overwhelming me with site features related to order tracking when I first sign up, it’s instead sent just when I first need it. That’s smart, and one of the triggered email secrets of Amazon’s success.

Triggered Email Secrets #4: Shipment Notification by Amazon

  • Who: Amazon
  • Trigger: First order shipment
  • Why it works: Shipment and order tracking tools are introduced to a new user at precisely the time she or he would find that information helpful.

5. Product Feedback Request

There’s no question that customer reviews are an important part of today’s retail marketer toolkit. However, not every merchant takes the time to explicitly ask for that feedback. Even fewer senders ask for feedback at just the right time, when a customer is most motivated and still noticing first impressions of the product. Consequently, an email triggered by order shipment (or better yet, delivery confirmation) is the secret to success with messages like this.

Triggered Email Secrets #5: Feedback by Banana Republic

  • Who: Banana Republic
  • Trigger: N-days after order shipped
  • Why it works: Timing is everything. Banana Republic’s note arrived in my inbox the day after I opened the package.

6. First Date Anniversary

Anniversaries, birthdays, and other key dates are opportunities to send messages to customers in a way that feels delightful, rather than like just one more marketing pitch. They’re also good building blocks for adding emotional qualities to the relationship you have with each recipient. This note celebrates the anniversary of a customer’s first transaction with ModCloth, and the promotional discount and social sharing features work well to drive additional transactions and brand reengagement.

Triggered Email Secrets #6: First Date Anniversary by ModCloth

  • Who: ModCloth
  • Trigger: 6 months after account creation
  • Why it works: Like a thank-you note, this celebratory message helps the customer feel appreciated, while the promotional discount and brand reengagement also happen to be great for business.

7. Inactivity and Reengagement Feeler

One of the best practices for any email marketer is making sure that recipients genuinely want to receive messages from you. That means a lot more than the minimum of opt-in (or even double opt-in). “List hygiene”—the regular culling of inactive and other problematic addresses—is a key part of ensuring high performing, highly-deliverable email that sends all the right signals to ISPs about user engagement. It’s also part of a winning engagement strategy that conveys to your customers that you treat them with respect. That’s why this message from Return Path is so successful. It serves an important functional goal, is highly engaging, and it’s a winning example of the sort of secret triggered email that more marketers should use.

Triggered Email Secrets #7: Reengagement by Return Path

  • Who: Return Path
  • Trigger: Period of inactivity/unread emails
  • Why it works: This message walks the walk of email best practices—and makes a “dull” list hygiene task anything but boring.

Triggered Email Is the Secret to Great Customer Engagement

These seven emails break out of the box. All are great examples of triggered email secrets for driving customer engagement. They overachieve on key metrics such as open rate, because the sender tailors them to the recipient’s needs and context. These examples also demonstrate a commitment to building an individualized relationship with the recipient.

What are some of your triggered email secrets? I want to hear your tips and tricks and what kinds of email are your own secret top performers.

—Brent
@brentsleeper

Triggered-Guide_Dev-Blogs_600x200_0816

measuring-email-deliverability

Let me start by saying I’m no mathematician, nor am I statistician, nor do I play one on TV. So occasionally, I need to look up the definitions of mean and median (cheat sheet: they’re the arithmetic average and the middle point in a series). I don’t think I’m alone in occasionally mixing up these closely-related (but nonetheless distinct) concepts.

Similarly, email deliverability, acceptance rate, seed list testing, and panel data are different ways of measuring delivery of email to the inbox. These metrics are related to one another, but they don’t mean the same thing. So, what exactly do they mean? And how can email marketers use these different approaches to evaluate the success of their campaigns?

Deliverability is the broadest of these terms. Deliverability is a fundamental metric for email marketers and other senders, because there’s no chance for a recipient to open, read, and respond to an offer if the email never arrives. Full stop.

Moreover, deliverability seems straightforward. If I send 1000 emails, and my server’s log files say 900 of those were accepted by receiving systems, then my deliverability is 90%. Simple, right? Yes… but no. What this figure represents is really the message acceptance rate. That’s because all the server knows is that the receiving system took the message, but not what was done with it. Did it go to the inbox? The spam folder? The sender really doesn’t know, because in both cases, the SMTP transaction is logged as as successful “250 OK”—SMTP itself doesn’t differentiate spam from legitimate email. That ambiguity is why server-side measures of message acceptance are just a starting point.

Acceptance rates don’t say anything directly about inbox placement. And inbox placement is what we really care about, for the simple reason that that’s overwhelmingly the most likely place a recipient is actually going to read our email. It’s safe to say that recipients who take the time to hunt through the various unsavory contents of a spam folder for a legitimate marketing offer are few and far between.

Addressing the question of inbox placement is why companies like 250OK, Return Path, and IBM Email Optimization offer seed list testing services. Here’s how it works: a sender includes special “seed” (test) email addresses at various ISPs among the recipients of their campaign. The seed list service providers then monitor those accounts with tools that determine where your email landed in their seed account—the inbox, the spam folder,… or perhaps if didn’t arrive at all. Because seed lists employ a known (and relatively small) set of addresses to test, they can give an answer about email performance of a particular campaign to those specific addresses. However, the information learned from seed lists should be considered at best directional. They can’t give you a comprehensive assessment of performance.

That’s where one more way to measure deliverability performance really becomes important: panel data. While seed lists use definitive results for specific email messages at a small number of addresses to extrapolate overall campaign performance, panels take something of the reverse approach. Panel providers like eDataSource monitor millions of real-world recipient inboxes (the owners of said mailboxes have agreed to participate in the research, by the way!) and aggregate data about message characteristics and performance over time. Thus, while seed lists are good leading indicators of the efficacy of a particular campaign, panel data is best for assessing broad slices of real-world performance. This includes overall message volume by sender, the behavior of senders in responding to bounces and feedback loops, and aggregate inbox placement across campaigns and time. Panel data is a powerful way to take in the big picture and to compare senders.

In short: email deliverability is a broad concept. It can be measured in multiple ways, including reporting message acceptance rates, performance to seed lists, and aggregate behavior as measured by panel data. All three methods of testing and measuring deliverability can be useful. All three also have their limitations.

When I consulted for email senders, I used to advise my clients to use a mixture of the three. Acceptance rates are the most blunt measure of how systems are technically working, but they don’t say much of anything about message performance per se. On the other hand, while seed lists provide a quantifiable way to see how a particular campaign is proceeding (and how specific tweaks to content, templates, etc., affect performance), they don’t give much of a big picture view. And panel data analysis gives you a good insight to how you’re doing relative to your industry and provides longitudinal benchmarks across campaigns over time.

(In fact, we use a combination of all of these methods to monitor different aspects of our own email deliverability performance at SparkPost. Empirical evidence is something we’re proud to stand behind when we talk about SparkPost’s inbox placement rate.)

Deliverability Inbox Placement

However you slice it, measurement, testing, benchmarking, and tracking inbox performance are critical to the success of every sender. Getting a message to the inbox is just the beginning of your customer conversation—but it’s the only way it can get started.

 

9 Things ISPs Really Want Email Marketers to Know

It’s Marketing 101: getting the right message to the right customer at the right time. As marketers, we think about that in display advertising, we think about it in media placements, and of course we should think about it in email marketing, too.

international email

When it comes to marketing in different international markets, that rule applies doubly. But, let’s face it, for a lot of us, sending email outside of the U.S. and Canada is an intimidating prospect. Too many email marketers try to guess at the privacy regulations, ISP rules, language preferences, and even time zones of their customers. And some email marketers don’t even try. They either avoid international marketing like the plague or—even worse—they ride roughshod over these important issues.

Let’s make this real for a moment. Imagine living in China, and getting email alerts at all hours of the night because marketers in North America either overlook or don’t care about the fact that you’re trying to get some sleep. Would you really want to keep engaging with that company? No! In fact, this very issue has become such a problem that many Chinese ISPs have begun to limit the amount of messages they accept at certain times to avoid their customers being woken up by late-night emails.

So what are email marketers to do? A great place to start is “Your Passport to Global Email Marketing Success,” a recent webinar SparkPost hosted with Dennis Dayman of Return Path and our own Len Shneyder. Dennis and Len shared tried-and-true best practices and forward-looking ideas for sending email outside of North America. The webinar was chock full of great information, and I definitely encourage you to check it out.

I personally was struck by a few questions from the audience that came up during the webinar Q&A. Here’s my take on the what email marketers are asking about sending messages to markets around the world.

1. How do I deal with opt-outs internationally? Is there CAN-SPAM or something similar outside of the U.S.?

Yes. To start, there is CASL, Canada’s ground-breaking anti-spam legislation. You definitely need to read up on that if you are sending email to Canada. (It goes without saying that SparkPost has your back on this one. We recently hosted a fantastic webinar about the ins-and-outs of CASL.) CASL is significant, but many other countries have their own privacy regulations that also require opt-out, such like the EU Data protection directive. Long story short, do your research before you send!

2. How much time can pass between an opt-out request and when it should take effect?

In the world of relevant and modern marketing tools, opt-outs should take effect immediately. There is no reason for delay, and every email you send after a customer has opted out could be a serious black mark on the recipient’s view of your brand. Having said that, you are afforded a grace period of 10 days or so in many national email regulations (though details may vary).

3. What’s the best time of day and day of week to send emails? Does it vary country to country?

Test! Test! Test! We can’t emphasize this enough. There’s no such thing as the perfect time of day—your recipients change, demographics change, who’s receiving it changes, and the importance they attach to it changes. All these things change and are testable!

4. Do I really need to use double opt-in for an international email list?

Yes. Email best practices dictate that double opt-in or confirmed opt-in is the right thing to do. Remember that in many markets, both customer expectations and regulatory policies require much more diligence than the relatively laissez-faire approach to opt-in and list buying that some marketers have taken in the past.

5. How do I keep on top of the changes taking place around the world and different worldwide email regulations?

Several organizations are great resources for staying on top of email marketing best practices around the world. Every email marketer should start following their social media feeds or newsletters—or even consider joining them as a formal member.

Though sending email outside of North America takes care and awareness of audience expectations and international regulatory issues, with the right information, it can be done! Check out the resources I highlighted in this post, and you’ll have a great start to planning a successful international email marketing strategy.

What’s been your experience with international email marketing? I’d love to hear from you. And do check out our “Your Passport to Global Email Marketing Success” webinar. I think you’ll enjoy it as much as I did.

FeedbackLoop_Blog1Two new feedback loops (FBLs) were released today by Return Path:

  1. Telenor: http://fbl.online.no/
  2. XS4ALL: http://feedbackloop.xs4all.nl/

These new Feedback Loops will follow the same format as their existing hosted FBLs: IP-based, ARF reports. For those not familiar with ARF (Abuse Reporting Format) reports, this format obfuscates the address of the user who complained to protect their Personally Identifiable Information (PII). More detail can be found here.

It’s important to keep in mind that simply applying does not guarantee your subscription will be accepted. The goal of offering a feedback loop for these providers is to help responsible senders to actively manage their subscriber experience by removing users who complain about their mail and using the data to adjust their targeting, in order to reduce user complaints moving forward.

In addition to these two new FBLs, there is a new resource on the horizon for senders, which will be available via the M3AAWG website. The M3AAWG Feedback Loop Best Common Practices group, led by myself and Kate Nowrouzi (also of SparkPost), has developed the M3AAWG Feedback Loop Resource Page which will be available to the public through the M3AAWG website in the next couple weeks. The page will contain:

  • A definition of the term “feedback loop” for those who are not familiar with them
  • A description of the various reporting formats
  • A list of all currently available feedback loops and links to their applications
  • Additional feedback loop related resources

Keep an eye on the M3AAWG website, Twitter, and Facebook pages for an announcement of the new resources.

If you are a SparkPost customer, rest assured that you are subscribed to all available feedback loops. We also provide guidance on program improvement to keep your recipients happy and complaints low. Find out more here.

-Clea

@EmailClea

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Email Marketing News Digest

It can be hard to say “Goodbye” to your list subscribers, but it’s not necessarily forever. Take some time to make their exit a smooth one and you may well see them again. Aside from optimizing the unsubscribe process, we have a great line-up of articles this week including a new survey that reveals customer preferences for marketing channels, and best practice tips for email engagement and design.

It’s OK for subscribers to say “Goodbye”

It’s normal to lose 30% of your email list each year due to attrition and that’s perfectly fine. Here are some ways to optimize the process and maybe even keep subscribers from leaving:

  • Make it easy to find the unsubscribe button
  • Make sure that your unsubscribe page is branded for a good last impression
  • Send them to a preference center – sometimes all it takes to keep subscribers from leaving is adjusting the email frequency or personalizing their email experience.
  • Get feedback so you can improve the email experience for those who are still on the list.

New mobile consumer attitude survey shows surprising results

A survey for Millward Brown Digital shows that 68% of respondents found a text or push message valuable. In addition 59% prefer SMS and push campaigns over other forms of mobile marketing including video advertising, banner, standard display ads and even email. More than 50% indicated that a SMS or push message would persuade them to make a purchase over other forms of mobile marketing.

Which Email Practices Seem to be Working for Brands?

Return Path’s recent study seeks to discover which email engagement tactics are working better for brands and a summary of the results can be found below.

ReturnPath-Email-Tactics-and-Engagement-Outcomes-Sept20131

65% of B2B Buyers Concur Emails Shape Their View of a Company’s Brand

A recent report revealed that 65% of B2B buyers agreed that emails shape their view of a company. Here are some recommendations on how you can build your company’s brand image through email.

  • Have your emails come from a specific person instead of a generic email address to increase open rates.
  • Drop HTML for Rich Text to increase engagement rates.
  • Speak to customers in a personal tone and have a company personality.
  • Keep the call-to-action high on the page and helpful.

Email Design Best Practices In 2013 (Infographic)

Email-Newsletter-Design-Best-Practises-Infograph

Weekly Email Marketing News Digest

This week, we’re looking at the fundamentals of email marketing – why it continues to be relevant and important, as well as why we need to ensure that deliverability is the top priority for marketers.

If customers do not receive your email, it means that they are not going to buy from you – plain and simple. That’s because they’ve not heard about your great new product, or that huge weekend sale, which means they won’t take action. The result? Your email ROI suffers. That’s a big deal since email continues to be the main channel that businesses rely on for ROI.

Billions of Opt-in Email Messages Never Reach Consumers, Return Path Study Finds 

Return Path‘s Inbox Placement Rate (IPR) Benchmarks Report shows that 22% of marketing emails that subscribers had opted-in to did not reach inboxes in the first half of 2013. 18% were blocked or went missing and 4% were delivered to spam or junk folders. The Inbox Placement Rates have declined since 2012 by 4%. The biggest decline was seen in Asia Pacific, which fell by 22% to 64%. One-third of all marketing emails sent there were never delivered.

The Return Path results call to mind the importance of not just deliverability, but working with an email solution and partner that is able to ensure your sender reputation and sender score are in good standing with the ISPs.

Focus on the Fundamentals

Responsive design and behavioral targeting are all well and good, but before embarking on ambitious advanced tactics, it’s critical to get the basics right first.

  • List growth: Ensure that interested subscribers are able to join your list without obstacles and they receive validation, on-boarding and welcome transactional emails in a timely manner.
  • Content: Send your subscriber base regular and strong messaging about your products or services.
  • List hygiene: Are you CAN-SPAM compliant? Are unsubscriptions and bounces being removed in a timely manner?
  • Reactivation: Do you have a reactivation process in place to re-enagage with inactive subscribers.
  • Testing: Is testing a central part of your email campaigns?

If you are not following these email best practices when it comes to these items in the above list, then you should probably get that in order before moving on to advanced features.

More Than One in 10 Emails Are Faulty

A recent study shows that 11% of marketing emails had one or more broken links. In addition, 9% of emails read on mobile phones and tablets had one or more broken links. More than 5% of all emails contained a broken image. Usability and readability issues have negative repercussions on a brand’s reputation so it’s important to ensure that email campaigns are effectively executed and deployed.

Deliverability Myth Discussed

What are some of the deliverability myths you have heard throughout your career? Here are some of the common ones:

  • Myth 1: Deliverability is all about who you know at ISPs.
  • Myth 2: You can’t use certain words in subject lines.
  • Myth 3: Deliverability is a black art that few people understand.
  • Myth 4: Deliverability experts work for the “other team”.

For more information on why these myths have been debunked, check out the original article.

10 Simple but Essential Email Marketing Tips

Want to find out how to reduce your email costs as well as ensure that your email is getting into the inbox? Download our free eBook on The High Cost of Free Messaging Software.

The High Cost of Free Messaging Software

We’re incredibly excited to announce our partnership with Return Path in the fight against email phishing in financial services today. Each year, email phishing costs an estimated $6 billion annually for US businesses. In a recent webinar, a Groupon security expert spoke of the increasing sophistication of phishing emails masquerading as legitimate brands. We’ve been told over and over again that prevention is better than a cure, and it is to this end that Message Systems and Return Path have renewed a partnership that we originally initiated several years ago.

Our overriding belief, that tackling the widespread problem of phishing begins with prevention, forms the basis of an all new security solution for financial services. The solution combines Momentum, the most powerful email delivery platform in existence with Domain Secure, the market-leading anti-phishing solution. This combined offering provides a two-fold benefit. On one front, Domain Secure combines visibility into potentially fraudulent email activity with email authentication to block phishing before it reaches the customer. On the other front, Momentum will provide best-in-class reliability, deliverability and visibility with unsurpassed sending speeds.

With the industry leader in digital messaging software and the global leader in email intelligence working hand-in-hand, Message Systems and Return Path are set to reduce financial fraud one email at a time.

Find out more about how the DMARC standard is fighting phishing when you watch our Don’t Deprioritize DMARC webinar!

Don't Deprioritize DMARC webinar

Weekly Email Marketing News Digest

One of the biggest tech news this week has to be the phenomenal rise of Netflix’s stock price to more than 40% since Wednesday. Some have called it the triumph of legacy media over new media – Netflix’s international subscribers grew by 229% last year and the company gained 2 million domestic subscribers. Just as reports of the demise of big entertainment are greatly exaggerated, so too are those that predict the end of email. In the world today, it’s no longer about marketing in winning silos, but integration and convergence.

And it’s also about listening to your customers.

Email Marketing: Why don’t you want to hear from your customers?

Note: This email was automatically generated from a mailbox that is not monitored.

Looks familiar? We’ve probably all seen this at some point in our inbox. Most likely, it’s a transactional email that companies send with your personal information included to remind you of a flight you booked or money you withdrew. In some sense it’s a highly personal email. On the other hand, it’s become incredibly impersonal for something that contains such delicate personal information.

Having a no-reply email means a missed opportunity for marketers to connect with customers that want to reach them. It’s like telling them to talk to the hand. Do that, and you could be losing some serious upsell opportunity.

Email-Social Integration: Past, Present and Future

We’ve seen a great example from Bonobos on how the company is using an innovative tactic to integrate email and social. Here are 5 other things a business can do:

1. Sharing email content into social streams.
2. Email acquisition via social channels.
3. Socializing email content.
4. Using social sign-in for account registration/opt-in.
5. Social CRM.

Personalization key for email in 2013

Personalization was big news in 2012, and it continues to be big news in 2013. You know what else is key? Email and mobile integration. Julia Rieger, Director of Marketing, LiveIntent says:

“Along with the rise of ‘Smartphones’ has come a resurgence of email as the primary tool for information exchange.  The first thing that most people set up on a new Smartphone is going to be their email accounts.

As the email address continues to gain in importance as the unique identifier necessary for joining and using services like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, former detractors will come to realize that email isn’t something to fix, it’s something to leverage to create greater engagement.

Beyond its messaging applications, email addresses retain their position as unique identifiers and database primary keys and as such key ingredients for ‘big data’ and CRM.”

We agree and we’d go one step further to declare that a marketer who is going to be a runaway success is one that integrates email, mobile and social into one seamless messaging stream.

Key Email Engagement Tactics: Benchmarks and Trends

A study has found that 50% of marketers are planning to optimize email campaigns for the mobile experience. Their plans include developing a rich-text mobile version (36%), promoting mobile apps (21%), and optimizing email dimensions (18%). Other findings:

• 71.5% of marketers are inviting subscribers to fill in surveys through email. 25% of these surveys are opt-out surveys, where marketers try to glean some info on why these customers are unsubscribing.
• More than 52% of marketers have used gifs in their campaign and the report states that gifs are a good way to attract attention.
• 21% of marketers use symbols in subject lines – a study has found that it could increase open rate by more than 15%.
• When it comes to social integration, Facebook (98%) is the number one platform, followed by Twitter (91%) and YouTube (45%).

Industry slow to adopt DMARC email standards

For those of you not in the know, DMARC was created by a group of companies, including our partner, Return Path, to set certain standards to reduce online security threats such as phishing. As our Chief Revenue Officer, Ralph Lentz notes:

“If you’re a bank, retailer, publisher or any kind of brand, do you want your email to be the only message in your customer’s inbox not flagged as DMARC-secure?”

While the speed of adoption by the industry may be in a grey area, adoption by the email community has been rapid. As of now, it is an email marketing best practice, but in a few months, it might not even be a choice for marketers, as all the leading gatekeepers such as Google, Microsoft and Yahoo are already on board.

Is your company’s email DMARC secure? Are you effectively integrating social, mobile and email? We’d love to hear from you in the comments section! Or you could find out more about DMARC when you download the How DMARC Is Saving Email eBook!

How DMARC Is Saving Email

 

Weekly Email Marketing News Digest

Last week’s biggest tech news was arguably from Facebook. Days before Tuesday’s announcement, the industry was buzzing with anticipation. Was Facebook going to launch a phone or a redesigned interface for mobile?

It turned out to be social search. While Facebook’s Graph Search continues to be in the spotlight, what else is new in the world of email marketing?

5 Automated Message Don’ts

Marketing automation may be the rage, but like all things in business, there’s a way to misuse the tactic and cause damage to your brand reputation. Here are 5 things to remember with marketing automation:

  • Frequency of event triggers: (a) Don’t annoy customers by sending too many messages based on event triggers. (b) Don’t train them to expect discounts each time they abandon shopping carts.
  • Length of time: Take into account that the length of time between a trigger and an email in the customer’s inbox can vary in effectiveness depending on time of the year. Test frequently to find the duration that gets the best results.
  • Personalization: Calling a potential “Dear Valued Customer” sounds robotic. Find a way to make the greeting more personal.
  • Mobile optimization: Ensure that even automated messages are rendered properly on mobile screens.
  • Time of the year: Coordinate messages especially in times of increased holiday traffic to ensure customers have a positive experience.

SMB Marketing in 2013: 85% of SMBs to increase use of email

Email is the most effective marketing channel for SMB marketers, with 77% of marketers reporting that it increases their revenue. Every $1 spent creates $40 dollars. Need some visuals? AWeber has created a great infographic to illustrate the results of their survey.

AWeber-Email-Mktg-Infographic

Smartphone owners more likely to read emails than make calls: stats

79% of smartphone owners use their device for email, underscoring the importance of optimizing emails for mobiles. Research by Adobe also shows that more respondents shopped on a tablet (44%) than a smartphone (20%). Respondents using the tablet were more likely to purchase a product on the device while the smartphone users were more likely to use the device for comparison shopping.

1 in 5 Marketers Say They Use Pop-Ups to Collect Email Addresses

A survey reveals that 22% of marketers are capturing email addresses through a pop-up box on their website. Most of these pop-up boxes are only displayed to new visitors. Other ways of capturing email addresses include:

  • Dedicated email page – 58%
  • Home page – 56%
  • Header – 15%
  • Footer – 38%

9 Reasons Why Your Email Marketing Campaign WILL Fail

Email is 7 times more effective than social media but if it’s not working for your business, here are 9 possible reasons:

1. Give the Impression of Spamming
2. You’re Not Cleaning Your Email Lists
3. Fail at Personalization
4. Don’t Optimize Email for Mobile Phones
5. Don’t Segment Your Email List
6. Don’t Provide Value
7. Buy Email Lists From Disreputable List Companies
8. Exclude Contact Information
9. Don’t adhere to CAN-SPAM
9. New List Members Are Not Properly Welcomed

If you’re interested in making your campaigns more effective, try evaluating it from the technical side of things. Our partner Return Path explores possible reasons why your email is not making it into the inbox of your customer.

Struggling with bounces, blocks and other incidents? Check out our white paper on Adaptive Delivery® to see how it auto-tunes your outbound email delivery parameters in real time to optimize delivery, safeguard your reputation and improve manageability. 

Adaptive Delivery Whitepaper